Things That Cats Hate People to Do

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There are things that cats can’t stand about people. Here are eight of those things that drive cats away rather than to you. My hope is that this article will teach us the ins and outs of the world of cats. I’ll start with the little annoyances and build up to “I want to claw your eyes out when you do that.”

Invade personal space

Just as we humans need our ‘alone time,’ so do cats. Someone demanding our attention every moment of every day would drive us nuts. The same thing can be said about cats; only the demanding would drive them under the bed.

Answer: Listen to your cat. When he is lying on your lap, allowing you to pet him, and he decides he’s had enough, give him his personal space.

Don’t show enough love

Just as we need to be loved, so too must our cats. People say that cats are anti-social. Not true. Cats are different from dogs, but when you think about it, they are more like humans. They have the same needs as humans, and love is at the top of the list.

Answer: Listen to your cat. He’ll tell you when he’s in a loving mood.

No help with grooming

Most vets will tell you that animals can’t reach all of their bodies. Sometimes they need a little help from their humans

Answer: Get a wire brush or a comb (ask your vet which one would be best for your cat’s coat) and groom your cat until his coat shines. This is also a great way to bond with him.

No attention to the litter box

This goes without saying. Put yourself in his shoes. Not only is it unpleasant for him, but it is also unhealthy for both you and your cat.

Answer: Clean the box out at least once a day. I have the Breeze system that uses pellets on top and pads below. It is so easy. Just scoop the pellets every day and change the pad every week. The pellets are good for three months. And best of all, IT DOESN’T STINK!

Play dress up

Your cat is not a doll, so don’t treat him like one! Putting ‘clothes’ on your animal (notice I stress the fact that he is an animal) not only is uncomfortable for him but takes away his dignity.

Answer: Keep those tutus and sweaters off your cat!

Declawing

All I can say is don’t. Your cat’s claws are nature’s defenses from danger. You might say, “But my cat is indoors.” But consider this, what if your cat should suddenly decide to venture outside. He would have nothing to ward off any predators with. Besides that, the pain must be excruciating. Imagine if someone tore your nails off.

Answer: Keep scratching posts available.

Loud noises

Cats are especially sensitive to loud noises because of their acute hearing.

Answer:  Turn down that stereo! Just because you like to ‘rock out’ (am I aging myself?) doesn’t mean that your cat appreciates it.

Convey negative energy

The last no-no in your cat’s kingdom is negative energy. Cats are sensitive to your moods. If you express displeasure toward him, he will most likely respond as a child would. He may even pout in his safe place. Don’t yell or spray water at him. Instead, treat him like a stubborn child.

Answer: Say no quietly, but sternly several times, and before you know it, he’ll be trained.

These are a few of the things that cats hate about how people treat them. Remember, a cat has sensitivity, dignity, and certain needs. This sounds a little like people, right? So think before acting…how would I like to be treated?

I would like to thank my friends at:

The Animal Rescue Site

How to Train Your Cat

Did you know that cats are trainable?  It’s true; with a lot of love and patience your cat can learn to do almost anything you want him to do (within reason, of course).  I, personally, watch every Jackson Galaxy’s “My Cat From Hell”, and on every program, he teaches how  to train your cat and their humans.  He almost always uses a clicker, which is designed specifically for training your cat.

I, myself,  trained each of my cats without the clicker, as I wasn’t aware they existed. Boy, I wish I knew then what I know now.  It would have made life a lot simpler.

You have to learn how to use the clicker, but once you do, it’s a piece of cake!  Below are two links to “How to…” books for using the clicker:
Clicker Training for Clever Cats: Learning Can Be Fun!

Clicker Training for Cats (Karen Pryor Clicker Books)

If you already know how to use a clicker and just want to invest one, you will want to click on the link below:

Bayppy Water Drop Shaped Pet Dog Training Clicker Kit Set with Wrist Band,2 colors 2pcs Dog Clicker Training System Tool for Dogs, Cats, Horses,Birds,Pets(Black+White)

A few general tips for training you cat are:

  1. Start off slow  ~ Do not expect your cat to leap over high hurdles.  Remember, this is a process that calls for patience on your part.  Small goals are most likely to be successful for you and your baby.
  2. Reward gains ~ Be sure to have lots of treats on hand for your kitty’s triumphs.
  3. Repetitions ~ Training has to be consistent.  Your cat learns best through repetition.
  4. Limits ~ Do not expect your cat to learn everything all at once.  Remember, just like with humans, learning takes time.  Again, approach the process with patience, love and rewards; lots and lot of rewards, both treats and praise.

There are other approaches that you can use along with the clicker training.  I readv a great one in Amy Shojai’s book, Complete Kitten Care

Amy Shojai, a writer of pet books, is another cat behaviorist that I truly admire. She has written many award winning books, one of which is, Complete Kitten Care.
One of her tricks is, when your cat is doing something you don’t want him to do,  HISSSSS!  That’s right, hiss.   It makes sense.  When he does not like what you are doing to/for him, he hisses.  Turn about is fair play.

I personally found that this tip works.  My 16 year old, BoBo, who is set in his ways, has the habit of jumping up on my very expensive chair, and start to knead.  Now, normally I wouldn’t mind, but as I said, this chair was too expensive to watch my cat tear it up. So, I tried hissing at him.  I admit, the first time he just stopped and looked at me, then waited until I turned away, and he started again. As I said above, repetition is the key to success. After the fourth hiss, he stopped and settled right down. There are so many other great tips in her book, Complete Kitten Care.

Of course, there are many other sites to go to find more tips on training.  Here are just a few:

Reader’s Digest

Love That Pet

Web MD

Our thanks go out to :

Jackson Galaxy

Amy Shojai