“My Cat Hates My Vet” by Amy Shojai

This book is written in the usual style of Amy Shojai who, as you know, is one of my favorite animal behaviorist.   It covers what to do when your cat has trouble with all of the stages of going to the vet, or anywhere else.

“My Cat Hates My Vet”  starts out with the first stage…getting her used to the carrier.  Amy suggests a few different carries, depending on the size of your cat.  For example, the carrier should have plenty of room for her to move around comfortably.  Getting your cat used to her carrier as she rides in the car may not seem like a big deal; but for those who have heard the heart-wrenching mews of a scared kitten, or the ear-splitting yowls of a mad cat while driving, know that this is not the case.  IT IS A VERY BIG DEAL!!

Ms. Shojai also suggests helpful tips like taking your cat into the vet when there isn’t anything wrong.  You do this to let the cat know that the vet and staff are not the enemy, and it is sometimes a fun place in which she can romp and play.  This way, there is less anxiety when she needs to go for her checkups, etc.

As usual, I found Amy’s “My Cat Hates My Vet” informative, as well as entertaining.    I give it 5 stars and wholeheartedly suggest it to any cat guardian.

“A Motive for Murder” by Morgana Best (Volume One)

I love Morgana Best. “A Motive for Murder” is the first of a four book series in which Misty Sales, an Aussie journalist for a paranormal magazine, who inherits her aunt’s house, strange neighbors, and a cat, Diva.  Together, Misty and Diva get in the middle of a war between two witch covens. It is a true battle of good versus evil and a race to see who will find a page from a book of witchcraft that enables the holder to stay young forever.

Misty is swept off her feet by Douglas, a seemingly honest man, with good intentions.  However, Diva does not approve and shows her dislike every time he comes around.

Then there is Jamie. Everyone around Misty is warning her to stay away from this man only Diva seems to trust him.   So, what is this page that everyone is seeking and why do all her new ‘friends’ think that she has it? Who can she trust?

Even though it was the second time around, I enjoyed this cozy mystery and give it 5 stars.

Click below to get this series

Supernatural Psychic Mysteries: Four Book Boxed Set: (Misty Sales Cozy Mystery Paranormal Suspense series)

What is Feline Diabetes?

 

When my first cat, Monkeyface, was diagnosed with feline diabetes, I was devastated.  I had waited too long to take him to the vet, thinking it was just old age.  He was 11 years old, and that is pretty old for a Maine Coon.  They can get to be 45″ long and weigh up to 30 pounds, and their small hearts have to work pretty hard to pump the blood through their big bodies.  They tend to succumb to heart failure.

Monkeyface was 20 pounds when he was healthy.  His fur was full and beautiful and his eyes were bright. When I finally figured out that he was sick, his bright eyes were dull, his luxurious coat had lost is sheen, instead of being the big, healthy cat that I knew, he had, not only lost weight, but he had become a shell of his former self…he was sick. I took him to the vet.  When he was finally diagnosed, it was too late and I had to put him down.  That was thirteen years ago,  I still, to this day, feel guilty.  After all of the love and companionship he gave to me, and I failed him so miserably.  If I had only known the signs of the disease, I might have given him more time.

The symptoms which Monkey displayed, but  I was not aware that they were signs of feline diabetes are, constant thirst; change in eating habits, either eating less or more; weight loss; fur losing luster; and lethargy.  Some other symptoms are UTI, sweet smelling breath, increased urination, and urinating outside the litter box.

To begin with, the exact causes of feline diabetes are not known, but it is more likely that overweight and /or older cats are susceptible to it.   Some other conditions that may lead to diabetes are hyperthyroidism, pancreatitis and/or abnormal protein deposits on the pancreas.  Some medications can also cause it.

Feline diabetes is all about the insulin, a hormone that helps move sugar from bloodstream into the cat’s cells.  As with humans, there are 2 types of feline diabetes’. Type 1 is brought on by a lack of insulin and is most uncommon. Type 2 occurs when the cat produces the hormone, but the cells become resistant to the insulin put out by the body.

Feline diabetes does not have to be a death sentence.  In some cases, shots are used to balance out the insulin and in other cases pills will work.  If your cat starts to show signs of feline diabetes, take him to the vet immediately and you may save his life.

 

 

Our thanks go out to:

ASPCA

Web MD

Cat Friendly